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State lawmakers are making moves to ensure the rise in vaping doesn’t block their “Healthy Connecticut” campaign.  

Speaking at a Feb. 7 event, Senate Majority Leader Bob Duff was one of several public figures who outlined the Democratic agenda to help create a better, fitter state. One of their first objectives was to find a way to help evaporate teen vaping, according to courant.com 

The 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey, which was commissioned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), stated last November high-school age vaping increased 78 percent. Among the more than 3.6 million minors who vaped in 2018, the survey also suggested a 48-percent increase among middle school students.  

Connecticut’s elected officials seek to buck the national trend.     

Among a series of bills introduced to the legislative body Feb. 7, Senate Bill 397 intends to ban flavored vaping products. The bill excluded menthol, mint and tobacco flavors, courant.com reported.  

Sen. Mary Abrams spoke out against the vaping industry’s claim for being an effective secession tool by long-time traditional cigarette smokers. Despite numerous personal endorsements and a bevy of correlating research, Abrams attempted to condemn e-cigarettes, proclaiming it as an “insidious conspiracy targeted at our children.”   

From 2015 to 2017, wnpr.org reported vaping among high schoolers more than doubled, rising to nearly 15 percent.  

At the event, Abrams spoke of Stanford University’s research, which heavily criticized the vaping industry’s marketing practices toward teens. JUUL Labs, the nation’s most popular e-cigarette producer was singled out by Abrams, who described the practices as “patently youth-oriented.”  

“There’s nothing kid-friendly about nicotine and other chemicals used to create those flavors,” said Abrams, who serves as co-chair of the committees on children and public health. “Or the lifelong health issues that can come as a result of early addiction.”  

For that reason, lawmakers produced legislation to help create a more“Healthy Connecticut.